Remember to register transliterations as well as English versions of your trademarks in China and elsewhere.  NBA legend Michael Jordan initiated a suit in China alleging the unauthorized use of  his name by a Chinese sportswear and footwear manufacturer.  Michael Jordan became a worldwide basketball star in the 1980s and 1990s.  Qiaodan Sports Company Ltd., changed its name to "Qiaodon", the transliteration of "Jordan", in 2000.  Not only does Qiaodon use the name Jordan, it often has used Michael Jordan’s iconic number 23 and a logo which greatly resembles Nike’s “Jumpman” logo (which Nike uses on Michael Jordan related products) on its products and advertisements.

Nike registered the trademark "Jordan" (in English) in China in 1993 but failed to register the Chinese version allowing Qiaodon to register the Chinese version in 1998.  Jordan appears to have acted after all of these years because other NBA players (such as Yao Ming) have had recent victories under similar circumstances.  Things appear to be looking brighter on the intellectual property front in China.  However, you should still take Michael Jordan’s situation as a lesson/reminder to register transliterations as well as English versions of your trademarks in China and elsewhere.…